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SuperEpic: The Entertainment War Review – More Like Slightly Epic

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SuperEpic: The Entertainment War is a Metroidvania-style game developed by Undercoders and published by Numskull Games. Undercoders are best known for their 2016 release, Conga Masters, and before that, they found some success in the mobile market.

SuperEpic’s main pull is its narrative steeped in Games Industry satire. To be more precise, a satire that focuses mainly on the greed of modern AAA developers, be it through microtransactions, mistreatment of workers, or plagiarising smaller studios’ work. These are things that crop up all too often in the modern gaming climate.

 

A Story of Little Subtlety

 

SuperEpic has you controlling the scarf-wearing Racoon Tan Tan, who rides atop his pet Llama. A game developer known as RegnantCorp is slowly killing off retro games by pushing out microtransaction-riddled mobile games, and it’s your job to stop them. If you’re looking for any deep, nuanced criticism of the Games Industry, you’re not going to find it here. It’s not something like This War of Mine, a game that beautifully captures the horrors of war and condemns the people responsible. It’s more along the lines of something like South Park or Grand Theft Auto V, things that criticize actions or ideas with over-the-the top characters and dialogue. This is by no means a bad thing; in fact, SuperEpic is dedicated to its overall narrative, and each area comically replicates a current issue in the AAA market.

Image captured from SuperEpic. Depicts the opening cutscene

My two favorite areas were probably the Employee Lounge and the Server Room. The employee lounge is the second area you visit and is a cushy, fake plant and gym equipment-filled workspace. I liked how this area served to mock how big corporations will create a false sense of comfort, by installing various leisure facilities in your workplace. Sure this isn’t always bad, but it’s often used as a tactic to keep employees reliant on their workplace, and therefore spend more time there. This doesn’t just apply to the Games Industry either, just take one look at any large company like Google or Facebook, and you’ll see a similar structure in all their major branches. I also loved the Server Room. This portion of the game has you chasing a programmer who is plagiarising ideas from smaller developers, and implementing them into his own work. I feel like this is a lesser-known problem concerning the AAA market, as it’s often hard to identify. Despite this, most people in the know wouldn’t refute the suggestion that AAA developers often “borrow” design elements from smaller, more ambitious teams.

 

Pigs All Over the Shop

 

I can’t say I’m blown away by SuperEpic’s art style. Like many of its fellow Metroidvanias, it harkens back to the days of 32 bit. The background of each area is relatively simplistic, with each having a pretty set, monotonous color to work with. There’s still enough going on in the background for it not to seem lazy – props like lights and plant life, for example. Simple isn’t always bad either; each area having its own background color to work with obviously helps them stand out. The visuals really shine in the context of the narrative. Each floor of the building follows its own theme, reflected largely in its …

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Sparklite Review: A Roguelite with Emphasis on the Lite

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Sparklite is an isometric action-adventure rogue-lite developed by Red Blue Games. Previously a mobile developer, this is Red Blue’s first effort on consoles. As such, Sparklite does have some elements that make it feel like a mobile game at times, but I’ll talk more about that later.

I come away from Sparklite with conflicted feelings. The responsive combat and competent upgrade system make for a fun time, but it’s held back by some grindy mechanics that feel out of place in this Zeldainspired title.

 

The Fractured World of Geodia

 

Sparklite begins with our protagonist and amateur mechanic Ada crash landing on the world of Geodia. After being allowed to explore for a bit, we encounter a boss fight that Ada has little hope of defeating with her current tools. After your likely demise at the hands of your enemy, Ada awakens in the game’s hub world and we learn what that whole ordeal was all about. It turns out Geodia is being exploited by resident bad guy ‘The Baron’, for personal gain. That thing we just encountered was one of his servants, and with the help of the nice folks on our new hub world, we might just have a chance at taking it down.

This is when we get into the meat of the game, and we’re introduced to various mechanics that make up Sparklite’s gameplay. For now, I want to talk about the plot and worldbuilding of Sparklite, so we’ll get into the guts of the gameplay later.

Image taken from Sparklite. Depicts player interacting with an NPC

There are some NPCs you encounter throughout your time in Geodia.

Sparklite’s story isn’t really anything special, but it manages to sell its world through visual storytelling. Each area you visit tells its own story, be it a desert full of goblins or a swamp full of venomous insects. As you find ancient vaults you learn more about how Geodia was formed, and surprise surprise: Ada is the hero destined to save it. This ham-fisted attempt at telling a generic fantasy storyline feels unnecessary, as each area tells its own story well enough on its own. The aforementioned desert area is very open, and only has walls on the edges of the map. Each room is connected, so it really feels like an open space. It makes sense that the goblins are here too, as this is the harsh environment that the Baron has recruited them from. It’s little details like this that tell Sparklite’s narrative, accompanied by a pretty catchy soundtrack.

 

Wait, Wasn’t I Here Before?

 

Sparklite’s bouncy flora and fauna match well with the upbeat music and colorful particle effects, I just wish that the art direction had a little bit more personality. Sure it’s cutesy and vibrant at times, but it’s not memorable due to its large similarity to plenty of other indie titles of recent times. Years down the line I think if you showed me a picture of Sparklite, I would have trouble differentiating it from other Zelda inspired indies of its time. I don’t find Sparklite to be an ugly game by any stretch, I just don’t find its cutesy style interesting and I’ve seen it far too many times to be wowed by it now.

Image captured from Sparklite. Depicts player at the starting point of the Acid Bog area

Sparklite

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The Grand Tour Game Review – Thru The Aphex

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Honestly, Top Gear ten years ago was unstoppable.

 

The charisma and stupidity which oozed from the musings and adventures that Jeremy Clarkson, Richard Hammond, and James May went on, and it was adored by everyone, even non-car lovers. In fact, when Clarkson had that “fracas” that jeopardized the future of the trio as TV personalities, it was close to a national disaster– A tragedy that Amazon foresaw, which is why The Grand Tour was quickly made.

 

Starting in late 2016, The Grand Tour quickly became one of Amazon Prime Video’s biggest hits for the service, raking in a fair few million viewers. Emulating the now-world-famous Top Gear but with a more bombastic edge to it, it was a perfectly acceptable return to form from the trio. It’s also an apt time to give the trio their long-awaited video game.

 

An in-game screenshot of The Grand Tour Game, showcasing James May's small compact car trailing behind Richard Hammond's larger truck.

 

Seriously, with the three lads being as much of a cultural pillar as they are, it’s surprising that it took until 2019 for a video game to be made on the escapades, creatively titled The Grand Tour Game. Maybe it’s the difficulty of trying to capture the show’s format and energy, but nevertheless, Amazon Game Studios tried their hardest with this game being their console debut.

 

The plot is– Well, there is no plot. What Amazon Game Studios have done is quite smart and commendable. Instead of you being stuck in an open-world, or a TV studio attempting to cook up half-baked ideas, you’re actually playing the episodes… kind of. In-between various driving montages that would usually fluff up the commentary and “journalism” present, you flawlessly transition to a driving challenge relating to the vehicle or challenge they’re about to partake it.

 

This presentation is, quite frankly, a fair amount of genius. There has never really been a chance to show this kind of tech off or a show that could easily translate to a video game like The Grand Tour, and the game does it superbly. One minute, you’ll be watching Clarkson wax what can begrudgingly be called poetics about the latest Lamborghini, the next, you’re actually driving that Lamborghini and playing as Jeremy Clar– Hey, wait a minute.

 

An in-game screenshot of The Grand Tour Game, showcasing a blue BMW speeding through The Grand Tour's Eboladrome.

 

For some reason, it broke immersion for me every time I turned the camera to see that Jeremy, James, or Richard weren’t actually driving the car in-game. You can’t even play as their professional driver, Abbie Eaton, either. It’s just some berk in a black helmet. It may not sound like much, but when you’re playing an episode like “Survival of The Fattest”, which has the trio in a 4×4 together with no windows, all you see are three nameless men, lifeless in black helmets.

 

Furthermore, the game continues to break immersion with the locations, or rather lack thereof. Season 3 of The Grand Tour had them trailing across the likes of Detroit, Southwest USA, Colombia, China, Georgia, Malaysia, France, Italy, so on and so forth, yet their environments are swapping between what feels like four or five preset ones. European locations swap between the same mountainous areas and the Scottish Highlands, Colombia and America are apparently the same. There are more examples, but my point is made already.

 …

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Top 10 Games of 2014 – The Year of Nintendo

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2014 marked the first full year of the current console generation, but somehow, Nintendo found a way to overshadow that and put out hit after hit on the WiiU and 3DS. Including honorable mentions, Nintendo has a hand in six of the games on this list.

Overall, this year lacked flashy game titles like those associated with Naughty Dog, Rockstar, or even Nintendo. A lot of this games fly under the radar in retrospect, but there are some real gems here, especially from Indie developers. The lineup packs a punch and delivers on some of the most important aspects of gaming: story, replayability, and exciting gameplay. These games amount to hundreds of hours of fun, whether it be with friends or solo.
 

Open All

 
Pokemon Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire
 

10. Pokémon Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire

 “While the remakes don’t stack up to the GBA classics, Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire bring the old favorites to a new generation, along with all the polish of generation 6. Catching them all is easier than ever with the dexnav, super training makes EV training easily accessible to newcomers to the competitive scene, and all your old favorite team members look better than ever. All the little tweaks make this return to Hoenn refreshing and the remastered soundtrack is the perfect cherry on top.” – Max Broggi-SumnerPokémon Ruby and Sapphire have a special place in my heart. It was the first time I had owned both versions of a Pokémon game. I replayed those games at least a dozen times. Pokémon Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire brought back some of my favorite games in vastly superior versions. The soundtrack was revamped, graphics overhauled, and new Pokémon and online features had been added. It makes going back to the original that much more difficult.” – Nathanael Hueso

 
Bravely Default
 

9. Bravely Default

 “Bravely Default is a perfect mixture of new and old JRPG traditions that appeal to players from all eras of gaming. The cutesy art style, epic story of heroes and villains, and job system are bound to draw in fans of the older Final Fantasy games. As to not just copy older traditions and hope to churn nostalgia, Bravely Default also has plenty of newer features that really make it worth playing.“The battle system stands out most here: players can store up their turns using a points system and use them all in one go. Some more powerful moves require you to have saved up a certain amount. Say you want to really lay down the hurt on a boss, you’ll probably want to save up points for your main attacker while maintaining the party’s HP with your White Mage. There are tons of challenging optional bosses too, most of which give you a new job class as a reward for beating them. This means you have to learn the ins and outs of each job before you can even use it.” – Lewis Mackin

 
Alien Isolation
 

8. Alien: Isolation

 “For a first-person, horror title, Alien: Isolation is pretty damn long. What it manages to do, unlike many other scary games, is maintain the player’s sense of helplessness. The Xenomorph is constantly chasing you around the ship …
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The Ultimate 2019 Holiday Game Compilation

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Black Friday is right around the corner and with it comes an exorbitant amount of new games to buy for the holiday season. Wallets around the world tremble at the mere thought of how many games people seek to purchase. Which games should you get? That’s entirely up to you, but this article hopes to comprehensively detail every major game release from September to December of this year. So sit back, relax, and grab some snacks as this is going be a long ride! 

Release dates are subject to change, so this article may represent inaccurate information after publishing. Ports and remasters will not be included in this list.

 

September

Monster Hunter World: Iceborne

Release Date: September 6th, 2019

Platform(s): PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC

Developer/Publisher: Capcom

Image result for mh world iceborne

An ambitious expansion to the critically acclaimed Monster Hunter: World heralded in the fall 2019 gaming season. While not necessarily a holiday release Capcom will heavily promote during Black Friday, it will undoubtedly serve fans with delightful gameplay and a beautiful world to explore. The expansion acts as a standalone game and was treated as a full release by Capcom, despite costing less than the base game. Keep an eye out for some price drops during Black Friday weekend! Note: you will need to own Monster Hunter World to play Iceborne.

 

Gears 5

Release Date: September 10th, 2019

Platform(s): Xbox One, PC

Developer/Publisher: The Coalition/Xbox Game Studios

Image result for gears 5 cover art

The newest installment to Microsoft’s Gears of War franchise arrived shortly after Capcom’s offerings. Gears 5 is available on multiple Microsoft platforms instead of a single console. You can get this juggernaut on Xbox Game Pass, Microsoft Windows, or Xbox One. Many consider this to be the best Gears of War game to date, so if you’re interested in the franchise, this could be a solid starting point. Given it is on Xbox Game Pass, we recommend nabbing that $1 promotion so you can play the game for practically free.

 

Greedfall

Release Date: September 10th, 2019

Platform(s): PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC

Developer/Publisher: Spiders/Focus Home Interactive

Image result for greedfall cover

This game will likely earn the title of hidden gem consider it’s sandwiched between two giant releases (Gears 5 and Borderlands 3). However, don’t let this one slip through your radar, if you’re into this type of game. It’s an open-world RPG similar to old-school Bioware games with a touch of The Witcher. Considering it’s already overlooked, this has the potential of being a nice bargain pick-up in Target or Walmart during or after Black Friday weekend.

 

Borderlands 3

Release Date: September 13th, 2019

Platform(s): PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC

Developer/Publisher: Gearbox Software/2K Games

Image result for borderlands 3 cover

Everyone likes Borderlands, except for those who hate it. In a climate in which every major publisher is jumping into the “looter shooter” genre, gamers are hungering for the franchise that nailed it: Borderlands. With this latest entry, folks can expect a myriad of weapons, characters, locales, missions, and a bunch of other wacky activities to engage in. Critics applauded its exhilarating gameplay and Gearbox is supplying Borderlands 3 with a plethora of post-launch content that will keep you playing for hours on end. This won’t drop in the 20 dollar range during Black Friday, but it’s brimming

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Halo: Reach Coming to PC on December 3

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Halo fans can rejoice, as Halo: Reach will be releasing on PC on December 3 as the first part of the PC release of the Master Chief Collection. This news comes courtesy of the Halo: Reach store page that received an update this morning, the day of the beginning of X019.

Fans have wanted MCC on PC for far too long and Microsoft has been pretty hushed about when that will be happening. We did know that Reach would kick off the transition, but with each passing day, it seemed more and more likely that we would be waiting until 2020.

The games in the MCC have all received raving reviews from critics. The Halo series, in general, has gotten consistently praised across nearly two decades of releases for its approach to the First-Person-Shooter genre. The PC release of MCC is supposed to come with technical improvements and upgraded capabilities. This should hopefully allow a whole new generation of gamers to appreciate the series from start to finish the way older audiences have.

We even gave Halo: Reach some love by officially dubbing it the seventh-best game to come out of 2010 (to be fair, it was a competitive year). It can be a hot topic among hardcore fans of the series, but many would argue Reach to be the pinnacle of Halo due to how the game handles customization and atmosphere. It will be interesting to see what slightly more modern audiences think of a slightly more modern take on these classics.

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Guerrilla Games’ Hermen Hulst Becomes Head of SIE Worldwide Studios

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PlayStation has found its replacement for Shawn Layden. Hermen Hulst, the managing director at Guerrilla Games, was announced to be the new head of Sony Interactive Entertainment Worldwide Studios. The news was reported by GamesIndustry.biz on Thursday morning, and they report that Hulst “starts the role immediately and will manage all of Sony’s game development across its 14 internal studios.” The news was also Tweeted by the current president of SIE Worldwide, Shuhei Yoshida.

Hulst started at Guerrilla Games when it was still under the name Lost Boys Games and around the time that their parent company went through a merger, leaving Lost Boys Games as an independent company. They would become the subsidiary of SIE Worldwide Studios in December 2005 in between the studio’s releases of Killzone and Killzone: Liberation, both of which were well-rated by critics. The company would receive universal acclaim for their work on the next couple Killzone games, but Killzone 2 definitely took the cake in the eyes of the industry when it released in 2009. Modern audiences know the studio best for Horizon Zero Dawn, a game that walked away from nearly every critic with a score of 8/10 or better, including our score of 9/10. Most recently, the studio made headlines by posting job openings for a vegetation artist, senior tools programmer, senior game programmer, senior producer, senior art producer, and principle animator, all of which point towards the development of a sequel to Horizon Zero Dawn. Guerrilla also had a hand in the development of Death Stranding, another game they’ve touched that has received rousing applause from audiences.

Sony has clearly been impressed with Hulst’s ability to manage these large projects and come out looking good every time. According to GamesIndustry.biz, PlayStation CEO Jim Ryan is quoted as saying, “Hermen is one of the most effective and well-respected leaders in the video game industry. He is a passionate advocate for the teams he leads and understands how to empower creative talent to build great experiences.”

After the departure of Shawn Layden from Sony a little over a month ago, there have been a lot of questions as to who will be taking his spot. After all, Shawn Layden remained the face of SIE Worldwide Studios for most of the PlayStation 4’s lifespan, one of the most successful consoles of all-time. He started his work with Sony in 1987 and worked his way up to a place where he oversaw the releases of The Last of Us, the entire Uncharted series, Until Dawn, Detroit: Become Human, Marvel’s Spider-Man, God of War (2018), and Horizon Zero Dawn. His accomplishments cannot be overstated. Now, Hermen Hulst faces a mountain to climb, and the entire industry will pay very close attention to how he tries to get to the summit.

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Top 10 Games of 2011 – The Year of Nostalgia

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Next up in our look back at the previous decade is 2011, a year full of games that are generally associated with their nostalgic qualities and atmospheres. One of the better of the past ten years, 2011 gave us dozens of memorable action games and some truly gripping stories and lore. Who comes out on top at the end of such a stellar year? The competition is stiff. There’s representation across the board; everything from plane crashes to slaying monsters has a place on this list:

 

10. BASTION

 

Bastion

Bastion is one of the most polished indie games I’ve ever played. The gorgeous art style, stellar soundtrack, and addictive gameplay established Supergiant Games as my favorite indie developer. The game’s customization and extra challenges are enough to keep you coming back to the world. The narration was a fantastic touch, too. I’d never experienced something like that in games before.” – Nathanael Hueso

 

9. The Witcher 2: Assassins of Kings

 

The Witcher 2 Assassins of Kings

 

The Witcher 2: Assassin of Kings tells a tale filled with politics, easily made enjoyable by the brilliant cast of voice actors. It’s shorter than most RPGs, but considering the two main branching paths and even more choices to be made from there, The Witcher 2 has plenty of replay value.

“Quests persist in being compelling. The theme of grey morality pops up constantly, and the rare difficulty in choosing what to do occurred for me multiple times during my playthroughs. I have a lot to say about The Witcher 2. If you want to see more, check out my Throwback Review of the game.” – Lewis Mackin

 

8. The Binding of Isaac

 

The Binding of Isaac

“I absolutely suck at The Binding of Isaac. No matter how many times I tried playing it, I just wouldn’t get better. That’s not the game’s fault. I’m just not that good at roguelikes. Despite its soul-crushing difficulty, it awakened my love of games like it. There’s something about its punishing yet rewarding nature that is inherently appealing to me. It’s a game I can go back to and still find rewarding every time, even if I don’t really succeed at beating more than the first playthrough.” – Nathanael Hueso

“The term ‘roguelike’ has pretty much become synonymous with The Binding of Isaac. Hot off the heels of his success with Super Meat Boy, developer Edmund McMillen tackled a new genre with his signature art style.

The Binding of Isaac wasn’t quite at full capacity when it came out, with many improvements and content being added in the later expansions. Regardless, The Binding of Isaac mixes together Zelda-esque dungeons with endless replayability. Randomization of item positions, maps, and the way it all comes together means that no run is the same.” – Lewis Mackin

 

7. L.A. Noire

LA Noire

“The moment my father, someone completely ignorant of video games, naturally became enthralled by the story and gameplay of L.A. Noire was when I realized this game was special. The fact it can transcend audiences with its brilliant investigation mechanics and compelling narrative design puts this game on the top for me. I am constantly disheartened that the people who made this game haven’t …

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Top 10 Games of 2011 – The Year of Nostalgia

Story 349554645

Next up in our look back at the previous decade is 2011, a year full of games that are generally associated with their nostalgic qualities and atmospheres. One of the better of the past ten years, 2011 gave us dozens of memorable action games and some truly gripping stories and lore. Who comes out on top at the end of such a stellar year? The competition is stiff. There’s representation across the board; everything from plane crashes to slaying monsters has a place on this list:

 

10. BASTION

 

Bastion

Bastion is one of the most polished indie games I’ve ever played. The gorgeous art style, stellar soundtrack, and addictive gameplay established Supergiant Games as my favorite indie developer. The game’s customization and extra challenges are enough to keep you coming back to the world. The narration was a fantastic touch, too. I’d never experienced something like that in games before.” – Nathanael Hueso

 

9. The Witcher 2: Assassins of Kings

 

The Witcher 2 Assassins of Kings

 

The Witcher 2: Assassin of Kings tells a tale filled with politics, easily made enjoyable by the brilliant cast of voice actors. It’s shorter than most RPGs, but considering the two main branching paths and even more choices to be made from there, The Witcher 2 has plenty of replay value.

“Quests persist in being compelling. The theme of grey morality pops up constantly, and the rare difficulty in choosing what to do occurred for me multiple times during my playthroughs. I have a lot to say about The Witcher 2. If you want to see more, check out my Throwback Review of the game.” – Lewis Mackin

 

8. The Binding of Isaac

 

The Binding of Isaac

“I absolutely suck at The Binding of Isaac. No matter how many times I tried playing it, I just wouldn’t get better. That’s not the game’s fault. I’m just not that good at roguelikes. Despite its soul-crushing difficulty, it awakened my love of games like it. There’s something about its punishing yet rewarding nature that is inherently appealing to me. It’s a game I can go back to and still find rewarding every time, even if I don’t really succeed at beating more than the first playthrough.” – Nathanael Hueso

“The term ‘roguelike’ has pretty much become synonymous with The Binding of Isaac. Hot off the heels of his success with Super Meat Boy, developer Edmund McMillen tackled a new genre with his signature art style.

The Binding of Isaac wasn’t quite at full capacity when it came out, with many improvements and content being added in the later expansions. Regardless, The Binding of Isaac mixes together Zelda-esque dungeons with endless replayability. Randomization of item positions, maps, and the way it all comes together means that no run is the same.” – Lewis Mackin

 

7. L.A. Noire

LA Noire

“The moment my father, someone completely ignorant of video games, naturally became enthralled by the story and gameplay of L.A. Noire was when I realized this game was special. The fact it can transcend audiences with its brilliant investigation mechanics and compelling narrative design puts this game on the top for me. I am constantly disheartened that the people who made this game haven’t …

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The Textorcist Available on Mac App Store

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Back at this year’s PAX East, I got to play The Textorcist, Morbidware’s gothic fusion of bullet hell and typing game. You can read more in the linked article, but to summarize, you have to both type out various words and sentences to deal damage to opponents while simultaneously navigating around danmaku-style bullets to preserve HP. There’s a variety of obstacles to face during battles as well, such as the words to type being obscured, giving each battles a unique challenge. The Textorcist initially released back in February on Steam, and publishers Headup are bringing it to the Mac App store, making it available to apple users as of today.

There’s an early-adopter discount for those who buy the game within the first few days, making it cost only $11.99 before Friday. After Friday, it will return to its normal price of $14.99. The App Store version contains all content updates, so you won’t be missing anything when you buy it. The Textorcist opened to great reviews, and is currently sitting at a 79 on metacritic and a “very positive” steam rating, so if you’re interested in bullet hells and/or typing games, this one is definitely worth a look.

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